Curiosity

fenestrationless
Corner of Cedar Hills and Hydraulic Road. The trees in this part of town are disappearing, soon to be replanted along the grand boulevards of Stonefield. I suppose the trees in the Route 29 median are gone for good.
Has the Muse of Architects been communicating on a regular basis with the builders of Stonefield? Will the addition of veneers, nature band-aids, signage, street lights and grifters make it feel more like Charlottesville? While the grifters might not be welcome to loiter and panhandle in the interior of Stonefield they’ll probably be able to set up along the Hydraulic frontage in the public right of way.
Curiosity (Martian rover) landed today. (illustration below courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech)

rover photo NASA/JPL-Caltech
Look at it. It has cameras, wheels, it is looking for something. Looking for the trees and where did all the Martian water go? Curiosity has a Twitter Feed.
When will the Big Windowless at Stonefield be activated? Is it a DT mall slayer robot?
Will it spew cars through Cedar Hills neighborhood? Is there a water feature? Does Stonefield have a Twitter Feed?

Church ISO new home

Preservation Piedmont recently documented the structure, and has been in contact with leaders of the congregation and Charlottesville-Albemarle Regional Airport to try to locate a new owner who will assume the responsibility and expense of removing it from the site. As the parishioners of Pleasant Grove Baptist Church have recently moved to their new facility, the new owner of the historic church would be free to repurpose the historic structure.

The historic Pleasant Grove Baptist Church is a fine example of a rural church type that is fast disappearing from the county’s landscape; the last chance to preserve the structure is running out. If you are interested in helping to save this structure, please contact Preservation Piedmont at preservationpiedmont@gmail.com or contact Bill Pahuta at CHO directly at 434-973-8342 x103.–Preservation Piedmont

Rivanna River


The Chesapeake Bay Foundation arranged a river trip for local political leaders on the Rivanna last Saturday. The Rivanna and the Chesapeake Bay, they are the same water. The EPA’s attempt to improve the health of the Bay is looked upon by many upstream as an unfunded mandate. It is a gift of awareness. We are critters, we live in an ecosystem. Clean air and water matter. Dirty water kills critters.

People who love nature and want to preserve access to public land understand they are dealing with a tricky balance, but they generally believe that in order for something to be protected, it must first be loved. A wealthy landowner will put 300 acres in trust for that love (and for a tax break), but the public will rally to preserve 10,000 acres of forest land only if they use it and know it.
The Rivanna River was our first highway. It is also beautiful and can only become more so if we turn our faces to it, as a community, instead of showing it our backs. Those of us who prefer secret, wild places also delight in the hunt for new ones.—Giles Morris, editor C-Ville