day of rest

sinners take note
STL through the windowglass 65 mph
STL, across the street from Bellefontaine Cemetery
storefront church by the SW corner of Bellefontaine
House of Prayer. The Lords House of Prayer Motto: psalm 122:1″ I WAS GLAD WHEN THEY SAID UNTO ME,LET US GO INTO THE HOUSE OF THE LORD” Founding Pastor Prophetess Pearl Gary. 5481 Union Blvd, St. Louis (MO), 63115, United States
“I would like to extend to you an open invitation to The Lord’s House of Prayer. A place where your problems are our problems and my success is your success. If you say that The Lord’s House of Prayer is not the church for you then I encourage you to attend another church because GOD HAS NEED OF YOU.”

Doers

St. James’s Episcopal Church, 1205 West Franklin Street, Richmond, Virginia

James 1:22-25
King James Version

22 But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves.

23 For if any be a hearer of the word, and not a doer, he is like unto a man beholding his natural face in a glass:

24 For he beholdeth himself, and goeth his way, and straightway forgetteth what manner of man he was.

25 But whoso looketh into the perfect law of liberty, and continueth therein, he being not a forgetful hearer, but a doer of the work, this man shall be blessed in his deed.

St. Mary’s Whitechapel

St Mary's WhiteChapel
Couldn’t walk around in DC during the inauguration, this seemed like a fallback. I’d been told that George Washington’s mother, Mary Ball, went to church here, a quick internet search didn’t provide confirmation, but she was born in this parish.

Near Lancaster, at the corner of White Chapel Road (Route 201) and River Road (Route 354) a mile from the Rappahannock River, is St. Mary’s Whitechapel, where an Anglican chapel of ease has stood at the site since the 1650s. President James Monroe’s grandfather was the builder of this structure. This parish also has a long association with the Ball family. The current Episcopal church, which dates to the eighteenth century, is a striking rectangular building with a hip roof, and the Flemish bond brickwork shows signs of significant repairs and alterations over the years. Inside, a gallery installed in the south end of the building was paid for privately by the Ball family for their own use in the 1740s. The one-piece baptismal font dates from 1718. The lovely church stands among numerous tall trees near the ancient graveyard at 5940 White Chapel Road, Lancaster. More history of the church and visitor information is available at www.stmaryswhitechapel.org and an information kiosk at the site.–George Washington’s Virginia– John R Maass