2014/09/06

walkable city

Filed under: Charlottesville,Urban Planning — WmX @ 11:08

sidewalk
The strip and curb, side of road = sidewalk. Is there a City official who has walked this thing?

2014/08/20

Riverdale

Filed under: architecture,damage,Urban Planning — WmX @ 12:59

cm0917-2036-riverdale

“…built as an addition to a small mid-nineteenth century frame house on Riverdale Drive
in Charlottesville for Minnie M. Barnes in 1912. The addition features rock-faced concrete
block quoins, a concrete block foundation and a tetrastyle portico without
capitals or bases.”- K. Edward Lay

For over a century this house sat on a bluff of the Rivanna, facing east toward
the Free Bridge. It has been torn down in the last few days. What next for this
lot at the eastern entrance of Charlottesville? A drug store?

riverdale site
Entrance corridor. Welcome to beautiful Charlottesville. This the former Riverdale site.
Cleared.

2014/08/12

High Street

Filed under: neighborhood,riverine,Urban Planning — WmX @ 08:49

entrance corridor

Charlottesville has a riverfront! Though hidden, inaccessible and
underutilized, it is a potential amenity with appeal to countless City and
County residents and visitors to the area. Nowhere is this fact more
significant than at the East High Street and River Road corridors. Attempts at
reclaiming the riverbank for recreational uses in the form of trails, playing
fields, and both passive and active green spaces, pay obvious dividends in
enhancing the quality of life for residents. Environmental and economic
benefits are likely to accrue as well. Incorporating Best Management Practices
for controlling storm water runoff as part of a river front park will help both
aspects. Less obvious, but tremendously important for the City’s continued
economic health, is the role that such amenities play in attracting a highly
skilled talent pool to a region. Increasingly, employees in the New Economy
are considering the proximity of recreational amenities to job and home as
they ponder multiple employment offers from companies in competing
geographic markets. The degree to which Charlottesville can integrate new
employment venues with such recreational (as well as urban) amenities, the
easier it will be for its companies to compete for talent. This will, in turn,
enhance the City’s ability to retain and expand its roster of New Economy
corporations.–pg 154 High Street Corridor Study December 2000, Torti Gallas and Partners CHK

domain-route-high-street

2014/07/18

O’Hare

Filed under: signs,traffic,Urban Planning — WmX @ 15:25

treat them like idiots
Chuck Marohn has an excellent podcast on the Strong Towns
site, a conversation with Ben Hamilton-Baillie, street designer and shared space advocate.
Marohn and H-B talk street design, traffic engineering and human psychology.

Streets and their sidewalks, the main public places of a city, are its most vital organs.–Jane Jacobs
The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Chapter 2

Streets define our cities. Learn about them…

2014/06/30

Rivanna River Planning

Filed under: riverine,Urban Planning,zoning — WmX @ 12:43

upstream from Free Bridge
Albemarle County on the right, Charlottesville City on the left

canoe from above
A decade ago it was unusual to see people recreating on the Rivanna. I saw ten boats yesterday.

riverbend
People in the river

runner biker
People next to the river.

scout stairs
There are two formal access points to the river along the shared 3.7 mile County City waterfront. The stairway at Riverview Park was built by Eagle Scout Chris Keeling

July 1 the City Council and the County Board of Supervisors meet. Item F on their agenda:

F. Rivanna River Planning
Historically, Charlottesville’s and Albemarle County’s economies grew in relation to the major roads and the James and Rivanna rivers. The smaller Rivanna River had manufacturing mills and a system of dams, locks, and canals for navigation. Nine miles of the Rivanna River and its south fork between the South Fork Rivanna Reservoir and Woolen Mills are designated as part of the state Scenic River system. Both Charlottesville and Albemarle County are responsible for regulating land use along the Rivanna, and both governments are now recognizing the growth potential of the river as a shared asset. Both planning commissions have advocated for, “creation of a plan that incorporates a unified vision for land uses adjacent to the Rivanna River which supports the river corridor as a destination; and that develops a shared vision for parks, trails, and recreational opportunities associated with the river.” There is potential for valuable synergy in the City and the County further developing the riverfront as a place to play and live.
Albemarle’s draft comprehensive plan states, “The City and County will create a unified vision for land uses adjacent to the Rivanna River that supports the river corridor as a destination while ensuring the protection and improvement of the river’s water quality.” The City has a River Initiative and River Corridor Plan which notes the need for coordinated planning, and the City’s comprehensive plan states, “Work with regional partners to draft and implement a plan that better utilizes and protects the Rivanna River as an environmental, recreational and economic amenity.” By working together, the Board and Council can help to make the riverfront more beautiful and valuable.

http://billemory.com/blog/2013/01/16/watershed/
http://billemory.com/blog/2012/07/26/rivanna-river/
http://billemory.com/blog/2010/10/18/clean-water-2/

(letter from the Woolen Mills Neighborhood Association Board to City Council)

October 3, 2013
Re: Rivanna River Corridor Plan
Dear Charlottesville City Council,
Congratulations on your recent adoption of the update to the City’s Comprehensive Plan. The
newly updated Plan, like the versions of the Comprehensive Plan that preceded it, prioritizes
restoring the health of the City’s most under-appreciated asset: the Rivanna River. In light of the
clear, urgent interest throughout the community on planning for appropriate land uses along the
Rivanna corridor, we are writing to urge you to take the necessary first steps now to ensure that
meaningful and productive planning can occur along the City’s portion of this invaluable natural
resource.
Goal one of the new Comprehensive Plan’s Environment chapter reads:
Value the Rivanna River as a major asset in the life of our City and region and restore it
to a healthy condition within our ecosystem in order to improve habitat, watershed health
and water quality.

Achieving this important goal will remain elusive unless and until our community develops a
unified plan for land uses, green infrastructure projects, and best management practices along the
Rivanna corridor. This is because haphazard review and approval of individual development
proposals as they are submitted precludes any real consideration of how each proposal fits into a
broader vision for the river and its restoration. A Rivanna corridor plan has been contemplated
at least as far back as 1998, when the very first recommendation of the Rivanna River Basin
Roundtable’s State of the Basin report was to “[d]evelop a Corridor Plan to guide decision
making related to preservation and use of the Rivanna River.”
Due to the absence of focused action from our elected officials in the City and County, the
pressure for such a plan is bubbling up in other places, as seen in the UVA Architecture School’s
recent Rivanna River Vortex project, as well as the joint discussions between the Charlottesville
and Albemarle planning commissions that were conducted as part of the TJPDC’s Livable
Communities Planning Project, and which culminated in a call for the “[c]reation of a plan that
incorporates a unified vision for land uses adjacent to the Rivanna River that support the river
corridor as a destination; and that develops a shared vision for parks, trails, and recreational
opportunities associated with the river.”
The need for a Rivanna corridor plan is stronger than ever. Impairments to the Rivanna remain a
significant environmental and health problem for our community, and development pressures
along the river are only bound to increase as the economy gradually improves. To have any
realistic chance of achieving the Comprehensive Plan’s goals of restoring a major asset of the
City to a healthy condition, our community must get started on a Rivanna corridor plan as soon
as possible.
As the critical first step in developing a meaningful plan, we request that the City issue a
request for proposals to map and inventory the natural, cultural and built resources
located along the 3.7 miles of the City’s waterfront.
What do we stand to lose if we do not plan? The Police suggest that homeowners inventory and
photograph their valuables; we suggest the same approach be taken with the Rivanna corridor as
it passes through the City.

2014/06/19

The giving tree

Filed under: bipedal,development,Uncategorized,Urban Planning — WmX @ 07:40

street stump
“Once there was a tree…and she loved a little boy.” Shel Silverstein.
In 1975 Charlottesville developed a street tree plan.
It was never implemented.
The way we get many of our street trees is making developers plant them,
when the development requires a site plan.
But when the required tree dies, does anyone replace it?
Street Stump!

2014/06/16

transportation services

Filed under: development,dolls,Urban Planning — WmX @ 13:03

man in a bear suit
The sense of enclosure and the shade these trees provide helps to make “mode-shift” more inviting.
Park the car and walk. Sadly, when individuals in this allee have been cut down in recent years
they have not been replaced.

2014/06/04

placemaking

Filed under: development,Urban Planning — WmX @ 06:40

wire sign cars landscape sitework road
Utilities, site, signage, vehicles in and out, landscape and grading plan, road. OK. Done. A new place.
(記号を翻訳してください)

2014/05/31

framework street?

Filed under: architecture,development,neighborhood,Urban Planning — WmX @ 16:18

Ian Lockwood
I wish I was going to Buffalo next week for CNU 22 , confab of new urbanists. My closest approach
was sitting in a room with Ian Lockwood this past week.

framework streets
Ian shared his transportation philosophy, spoke earnestly about connectivity, and showed a map
that alternately intrigues and terrifies. What exactly is a framework street? Reserving judgement until it is
possible to learn more. Does the finish detail of the Duke of Gloucester Street qualify for a modern framework street?

network
Some new wine doesn’t belong in the old bottle.

2014/03/19

Wertland Street

Filed under: architecture,Urban Planning — WmX @ 08:57

domestic and brutal architecture

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