2015/05/27

four days late- Chelydra serpentina

Filed under: fauna,slabtown — WmX @ 07:28

Chelydra serpentina

Chelydra serpentina, four days late to the party, world turtle day, May 23. Organizers were not surprised.
“Timeliness is not a concern, we are an association of Turtles.”

2015/05/11

Coragyps atratus

Filed under: Charlottesville,fauna,Urban Planning — WmX @ 08:40

vulture profile

The black vulture (Coragyps atratus) also known as the American black vulture, is a bird in the New World vulture family whose range extends from the southeastern United States to Central Chile and Uruguay in South America.–Wikipedia



vultures on the roof

Humans like to anthropomorphize animals. In that vein, the vultures are very mannerly. They wait their turn at the table.



vulture eying morsels

Density (check) City services (check) Food options (check) Walkability (not really a concern) Sustainability (check)



at the table

Connectivity (check) Mixed use and diversity (check) Traditional neighborhood structure (check) Smart transportation (check) Quality architecture and urban design (?)

2015/05/08

Quiscalus quiscula

Filed under: fauna — WmX @ 08:23
grackle

The grackle can also mimic the sounds of other birds or even humans, though not as precisely as the mockingbird, which is known to share its habitat in the Southeastern United States.–Wikipedia
Opportunistic omnivors. Like us.

2015/05/01

Equus ferus caballus

Filed under: dolls,fauna,signs,strange land — WmX @ 09:39
horse advertising

Business Style Slot machine for 20 Yen Pachinko for 0.5 Yen
Pachinko for 1 yen
In answers to request from many customers
Recurrence of Origin
Slot machine for 2 Yen
Pachinko for 0.5 Yen

2015/04/22

in praise of the dead

Filed under: dead,fauna,trees — WmX @ 08:33
snag in Cook forest

Standing dead trees are an important resource for the living.

But a dead tree, contrary to popular perception, has a plus side. Called a snag, it plays host to a variety of insects, fungi, spiders, and other small native creatures of the woodland; a variety of mammals, including flying and gray squirrels, raccoons, and others; and, surprisingly, about eight-five species of birds in North America. In a forest, at least, maturity and deadwood are relative terms.–Robert Halma, “The Lehigh Valley: A Natural and Environmental History”

 
Excellent article on dead trees, see: “Praise the Dead: The Ecological Values of Dead Trees” by George Wuerthner

2015/04/02

tooth and claw

Filed under: dead,fauna — WmX @ 10:48
Turdus migratorius

winter didn’t end soon enough for this American Robin

2015/03/22

Platanus occidentalis

Filed under: fauna,fishbones,flora — WmX @ 08:35
hawks in sycamore

The red-tailed hawk displays sexual dimorphism in size, with females averaging about 25% heavier than males.–Wikipedia

2015/02/26

little brown birds

Filed under: fauna,weather — WmX @ 10:03
finches?

True sign of being a geezer. Enjoying birds more than live amplified music.

2015/02/22

Failed jetty, Town Creek

Filed under: fauna,riverine — WmX @ 09:34

What damages the boards, time + Teredo navalis? (the naval shipworm, not really a worm…)


30 x1028 px box


Photoshop everywhere, some places more obvious than others.

2015/01/14

Alosa pseudoharengus

Filed under: fauna,signs — WmX @ 14:19

westport river

Alewives reach a maximum length of about 40 centimeters (16 in), but have an average length of about 25 centimeters (10 inches). The front of the body is deep and larger than other fish found in the same waters, and its common name is said to come from comparison with a corpulent female tavernkeeper (“ale-wife”).
Alewives are perhaps best known for their invasion of the Great Lakes by using the Welland Canal to bypass Niagara Falls.–Wikipedia


alewife, kiack, gaspereau, sawbelly, mooneye

Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress

Loading