green

this photo is from the Northern Neck of Virginia, near Slabtown. I didn’t plant any of this grass. The grassed area had been in a soybean/corn rotation for the past 30 years (at least). A contractor in the neighborhood likes to say that grass “just happens”. The grass visible in this photo volunteers in late fall, after the Panicum dichotomiflorum stops growing. I wish this grass was year round… What is it?

Maladera castanea, Asiatic garden beetles

breakfast buffet for crows
The Asiatic Garden Beetles are back, feeding at night on tender oak leaves. The AGBs are attracted to electric light. Don’t swim well. So this tupperware pool, lit from below, attracts about twenty-five beetles per night. The beetles tread water until just after dawn when the crows come and enjoy crunchy breakfast buffet.

A native of Japan and China, where it is not an important pest, the
Asiatic garden beetle (Maladera castanea) was first discovered in
the United States in New Jersey in 1922. Asiatic garden beetle grubs
feed off the roots of grasses and weeds in early spring. Adult beetles
attack many different vegetable, herb, fruit, and ornamental plants,
feeding mostly at night where they strip, shred, and notch the foliage
of their hosts. Asiatic garden beetle damage is especially prevalent
around the leaf margins.–University of New Hampshire

Hudson River Greenway

Hudson River Greenway
Walked south on the Hudson River Greenway. The Charlottesville greenbelt is a very different walk. In Charlottesville the intersection of river and the land retains natural function plus native flora and fauna. There is communication going on between river and land. Loved walking the Hudson but the Rivanna has more to say.