reenactor


Charlottesville was established as a gridded town plan from the start. Dr. Thomas Walker was assigned by the County as Trustee, and a two acre public square was set aside for the courthouse at the northern edge of the fifty acre town. The site for the courthouse was selected on a hillside directly above the gridded village, several blocks above Three Notch’d Road or the main street of town. Over time, business activities around the Court Square included taverns, tailors, milliners, a printing shop, a gunsmith, and a jeweler. A portion of the original courthouse (1803) still stands as a part of the current complex of structures. The original twenty-eight block grid corresponds to the following existing streets: Sixth and McIntire on the east and west respectively, Jefferson and South on the north and south. A plan from 1818 indicated east/west streets as 66 feet in width, while north/south streets as 33 feet wide; this plan also indicated a two block by seven block annexation added directly to the north of the original grid.– Ken Schwartz

neighborhood model

named the opposite of what it is
My introduction to real estate advertising was an issue of Mad Magazine in the 1960’s.
Honest to goodness, discover Treesdale.
Note the three foot wide planting strip to the left of the sidewalk on the edge of Rio Road. Where are the trees to shade pedestrians?
Where is the “planting strip” wide enough to support trees?
(Techniques outlined in the magazine seem to be in play here.
Name your real estate development what it is not.
Formerly this section of Rio Road was lined with massive oaks…)

mallside is accurate

Land use planners have spent too much time focusing on numbers: the number of units per acre, the number of cars per hour, the number of floors per building, and not enough time on the values, customs, characteristics, and quirks that make a place worth caring about. Edward T McMahon


Dazzle with a clever name. Put a giraffe on the roof.


I believe the name of this development is the East Rio Office Park. Dentists, lawyers and deer. I challenge any member of the Albemarle County Board of Supervisors to walk Route 29 from Rio Road to the City line and say:
“I don’t see the need for Places 29”

These neighborhoods and their centers will be pedestrian-oriented and mixed-use; they will offer a variety of housing choices, retail environments, office types, and employment opportunities. They will be connected by an attractive, efficient, and accessible multimodal transportation system.–AlbCo Community Development