neighborhood model

named the opposite of what it is
My introduction to real estate advertising was an issue of Mad Magazine in the 1960’s.
Honest to goodness, discover Treesdale.
Note the three foot wide planting strip to the left of the sidewalk on the edge of Rio Road. Where are the trees to shade pedestrians?
Where is the “planting strip” wide enough to support trees?
(Techniques outlined in the magazine seem to be in play here.
Name your real estate development what it is not.
Formerly this section of Rio Road was lined with massive oaks…)

mallside is accurate

Land use planners have spent too much time focusing on numbers: the number of units per acre, the number of cars per hour, the number of floors per building, and not enough time on the values, customs, characteristics, and quirks that make a place worth caring about. Edward T McMahon


Dazzle with a clever name. Put a giraffe on the roof.


I believe the name of this development is the East Rio Office Park. Dentists, lawyers and deer. I challenge any member of the Albemarle County Board of Supervisors to walk Route 29 from Rio Road to the City line and say:
“I don’t see the need for Places 29”

These neighborhoods and their centers will be pedestrian-oriented and mixed-use; they will offer a variety of housing choices, retail environments, office types, and employment opportunities. They will be connected by an attractive, efficient, and accessible multimodal transportation system.–AlbCo Community Development

Individually Protected Property

J.S.Young office building
J.S.YOUNG & CO. OFFICE BUILDING ARCHITECTURAL DESCRIPTION
The Young Building is the only example of the Jacobean Revival style in Charlottesville. The basic form of the
building is that of a 2-storey, 5-bay, single-pile structure with a rear addition of nearly equal size. The high
foundation is covered with concrete up to the water table. The walls are veneered with brick laid in stretcher bond.
There are comer quoins of rusticated brick and a projecting string-course. The main block of the building has a
medium-pitched gabled roof, covered with composition shingles, with deeply projecting eaves and decoratively
shaped rafter ends. The great Jacobean gables at the ends of the main block and over the central bay of the facade
are topped with metal finials. The central gable also has metal scroll cresting. A circular attic window in each gable
has been closed. There are two small interior chimneys. Widows are double-sash, 4-over-1 light, jack-arched at
the first-storey level and segmental-headed at the second. Basement windows are very short 3-light hinged sash.
There is no indication, either architecturally or on the Sanbom maps, that the building ever had any sort of entrance
porch, although there was undoubtedly something more formal than the present concrete steps that lead directly up
to the central entrance. The door is flanked by narrow 9-light casement windows, and all have transoms set under
a single segmental arch. Above the entrance, the central bay of the facade projects slightly and is crowned by a
Jacobean gable. This wide bay has two windows with a decorative brick diamond with a “Y” between them. The
hipped-roofed addition covering most of the rear elevation appears to be original and matches the main block in
all details, lacking only the Jacobean gables.–SURVEY OF 18 NATIONAL REGISTER PROPERTIES
AND PROPOSAL FOR LOCAL DESIGNATION Charlottesville Virginia July 1993

scary


My fears regarding the future of neighborhoods? Cut them open to get to the golden eggs, trade them for a handful of magic beans, shrink National Historic Districts and ADC’s to the size of handkerchiefs, widen roads, install sewage pipes in the air, cut down the trees, fire engines everywhere. Anything is possible.
Charlottesville Tomorrow has the story: