broken promise?

Developer of Carlton Views III is hoping that the Planning Commission will allow a departure from their proffer: Proffer 3(f) states: “The Landowners shall retain the existing tree canopy on the east side of the Subject property, adjacent to Franklin Street, within an area designated as open space for the PUD.” To date the City has shown low expectations regarding this developer’s work product. (If you’d like to know more DM me, Planning Commission will decide last thing tonight)

Doug

Douglas Call Dabney, died on Thanksgiving Day, 2019. He was born October 22, 1952, to Thomas Todd and Lucy Call Dabney. He is survived by his devoted wife, Jo Dabney and her daughter, Rebecca Tirs; his brother, Todd Dabney Jr.; his sister, Susan Dabney Smith; and many cousins, nieces, nephews and friends. Doug’s life exemplified the meaning of “joie de vivre” from its start until its finish. He derived joy from his childhood and college activities and escapades. He loved all sports, especially lacrosse and football, hunting, fishing, golf, cycling and sailing. He was an adventurer, a risktaker and a contemplative non-complainer. His never-failing cheerful enjoyment of the simple pleasures in his life was inspirational for all who knew him. Because of the superlative care given to him by his parents and Jo and Becca, he was able to live courageously with grace and dignity. He was proud of his education, thirteen years at St. Christopher’s School and four years at The University. He avidly followed UVA team sports. He delighted in all food, drink and good cigars, and in stories and pictures of the lives of friends and family. He liked telling stories of his past adventures and of imagining himself having new ones. He loved his Tiggy kitty and his people and we him. He fought the good fight. We miss him. We think Doug would appreciate the wearing of UVA colors at the celebration of his life, so please feel free to do so on Saturday, December 7, from 1 until 3 p.m. at Bliley’s-Central, 3801 Augusta Avenue. In lieu of flowers, you are welcome to make a donation to any animal rescue organization.

Branta canadensis

fly away
Public health and safety risks are a growing concern with Canada geese. A large population of geese that frequents a lawn, a golf course, or an agricultural field can leave behind an unpleasant mess. Studies have shown that a well-fed, healthy adult Canada goose can produce up to 1.5 pounds of fecal matter per day. Where resident goose populations are sizeable (>100 birds), the continuous influx of nutrients contained in Canada goose feces can contribute to the eutrophication of small water bodies, especially those that have restricted circulation and flow-through, which in turn may stimulate algae and weed growth. Bacteria and particulate matter contained in goose feces, when present in sufficient quantity, may lead to the need for special treatment of drinking water drawn from surface ponds or reservoirs where geese congregate. Additionally, beaches and other public areas littered with accumulated goose feces have been closed due to the contamination or the threat of personal injury resulting from falls as people lose footing on the slippery material.–Center for Human Wildlife Conflict Resolution