John S. White house

left quercus alba?
The John S. White House at 854 Locust Avenue was built by the prominent real estate lawyer and postmaster John S. White in 1903, just after he purchased the land from G. R. B. Michie. White was in business with William F. Long, for whom Long Street was eventually named. In 1910, White lived in the house with his wife, an infant son, his single brother-in-law, and two female African American servants who acted as nurse and cook, respectively.
Set far back from the street on a large lot and shaded by mature trees, this two-story, two-bay, house … has a hipped roof and is constructed of brick laid in common bond and painted. The north bay of the facade projects slightly and has a full pediment filled in with fish scale shingles; a hipped-roof, semi-hexagonal bay is attached to the north elevation; and a two-story, hipped-roof, two-bay addition is attached to the south elevation, set back from the facade and facing the street. A hipped-roof porch with slender Tuscan columns shades the recessed south bay and abuts the north bay of the facade. The south bay features the double glass doorway and a two-light transom. The 2nd floor of the south bay has a pair of narrow one/onesash
windows. The north bay features a single two/two-sash window on the 1st floor and a narrower one/one-sash window on the second. All of the windows have louvered shutters. The fully pedimented gable of the north bay retains the overhanging eave and cornice that characterizes the rest of the building, is filled in with wooden fish scale shingles, and has a small fanlight at its center. The roofs of both the porch and the house itself are covered in asphalt shingles. A modern, wooden ramp leads to the front entrance from the north side of the house. A one-story kitchen wing and a back porch are attached to the rear of the house.– (excerpted from the Martha Jefferson Historic District National Register of Historic Places registration form authored by Lydia Mattice Brandt PhD)

message in a bottle

Municipal Band plays to crowd assembled at the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society to celebrate the “birthday” of CHO 250 years ago, 12/23/1762

A time capsule was gathered up, a box to be opened in 2062. Citizens were encouraged to leave a note for the future.

Photographer Ed Roseberry, a man whose images comprise a powerful record of more than the past fifty years, was on the job. Shooting with his trusty twin lens Rollieflex.

John Crow

The Town of Culpeper is having a “buzzard problem”. Big birds are hanging out doing their business where the town doesn’t want them.
Forty miles southwest, the City Council of Charlottesville discussed a perceived problem with assemblages of humanoids on their mall, at their meeting November 19. Members of the public made colorful use of language in defense of the humanoids right to sleep on the sidewalk, use base language and solicit funds from passers-by.

What options are in a town’s toolbox for dealing with unwanted wildlife?

Occasionally, a dead vulture (or a replica thereof) may be hung upside down from a tree or tower to get the vultures’ attention. “Using effigies deters roosting,” said town Public Works Director Jim Hoy.–Free Lance-Star

That would make for interesting photos. Other means:

Beginning Dec. 3, town employees (not police), along with officials from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, will make another attempt to run the unwanted residents out of town.
An aerial bombardment, with loud firecracker-type devices, will be used to get the birds to move their roosts to rural areas. If that fails, some of the more than 70 buzzards will probably be shot.–Free Lance-Star

I have a liking for turkey vultures. They consume animals killed by automobiles. They are a working part of the eco-system. They are monogamous, they live a long time, they soar, they don’t talk. They can projectile vomit on you if you get in their space but generally, they do their business, cleaning up (their species name, Cathartes aura, means “cleaning breeze” in Latin).
So, the Town of Culpeper might shoot the offending birds? What about protection conferred by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 (MBTA)? What is the exception?

My favorite vulture site, the Turkey Vulture Society
Charlottesville TVs

lost in the funhouse

If any of the family members go missing this weekend it is a good bet they are burning in new neural pathways,
trying to find the front door, trying to find their car, trying to find their way in and around Stonefield.

Neighborhood Style Development-Bringing the pleasures and convenience of urban life to the suburbs.–Edens

A riot of light, color, and modern building materials assembled to resemble legacy forms. A laying down of cataclysmic money. Many new McJobs.