Somewhere along the line, people decided they needed closets. My 1890 worker house doesn’t have these nasty newfangled spaces. It has square rooms.

In North America, chests, trunks and wall-mounted pegs typically provided storage prior to World War II. Built-in wall closets were uncommon and where they did exist, they tended to be small and shallow. Following World War II, however, deeper, more generously sized closets were introduced to new housing designs, which proved to be very attractive to buyers. It has even been suggested that the closet was a major factor in peoples’ migration to the suburbs.–Wikipedia

Liriodendron tulipifera

November 2006, west lawn, Monticello
Tulip trees on the west side of Monticello.
leigh trigg and Th. Jefferson's tulip tree
This is an old tree. There is evidence it was planted April 16, 1807. I have five tulip trees to plant this weekend. This tree is 22 feet in circumference, the trees I am planting are 3/4 of an inch in circumference.
This tree affected many lives. One was my neighbor Mike Van Yahres grandfather’s. (Visit Monticello’s podcast section and search poplar for that story)
The tree was removed. Profound health issues. I am pleased that the grounds people are leaving the stump in place for awhile. It is a memorial.

See Patterson Clark’s excellent article in the Washington Post about tulip trees.