green

this photo is from the Northern Neck of Virginia, near Slabtown. I didn’t plant any of this grass. The grassed area had been in a soybean/corn rotation for the past 30 years (at least). A contractor in the neighborhood likes to say that grass “just happens”. The grass visible in this photo volunteers in late fall, after the Panicum dichotomiflorum stops growing. I wish this grass was year round… What is it?

elected mayor?

before the selection
Former CHO City Manager Maurice Jones and Ms. Nikuyah Walker, January 2, 2018
media in the background
I can’t remember the first time I saw a sign in Council Chambers. It is a common practice these days.
There has been talk recently by Council regarding amending the City Charter for various purposes. Evidently, Charter amendments require legislative approval. Charlottesville City Attorney recommends putting together a package to do some housekeeping. Some of the language in the Charter seems decidedly antiquated.

Twelfth. Use of streets; abuse of animals. Insofar as not prohibited by general law, to prevent the riding or driving of animals at improper speed, to regulate the speed and manner of use upon the streets of said city of all animals or vehicles; to prevent the flying of kites, throwing of stones, or the engaging in any employment or sport in the streets or public alleys, dangerous or annoying to the public, and to prohibit and punish the abuse of animals.

Thirteenth. Drunkards, vagrants and beggars. To restrain and punish drunkards, vagrants, mendicants and street beggars.

Fourteenth. Offenses generally. To prevent vice and immorality; to preserve public peace and good order; to prevent and quell riots; disturbances and disorderly assemblages; to suppress houses of ill fame, and gaming houses; to prevent lewd, indecent or disorderly conduct or exhibitions in the city, and to expel from said city persons guilty of such conduct.

Anaxyrus americanus americanus

I was fixing to clean up around the base of my sycamore tree, ran into this fellow. Postponed the cleanup.
When cold weather comes, these toads dig backwards and bury themselves in the dirt of their summer homes, or they may choose another site in which to hibernate.[6] Their diet includes crickets, mealworms, earthworms, ants, spiders, slugs, centipedes, moths, and other small invertebrates. Some of these toads have been known to live over 30 years and currently a female specimen (over 13 centimeters long) is living healthily into her late 30s.–Wikipedia